24 Hour Assistance
+65 6570 2552

 

 

PROVIDING TRAVELLERS WITH PEACE OF MIND FOR OVER 20 YEARS

EMA GLOBAL, a pioneer in the assistance industry is a leading provider of air ambulances and medical flights. We offer unparalleled medical care and bedside-to-bedside transportation and have some of the most experienced air medical teams in the industry. With extensive networks across the globe, EMA GLOBAL delivers a seamless transport experience to our customers regardless of location. Help is just phone call away!

 

24 Hour Assistance
+65 6570 2552

 

 

PROVIDING TRAVELLERS WITH PEACE OF MIND FOR OVER 20 YEARS

EMA GLOBAL, a pioneer in the assistance industry is a leading provider of air ambulances and medical flights. We offer unparalleled medical care and bedside-to-bedside transportation and have some of the most experienced air medical teams in the industry. With extensive networks across the globe, EMA GLOBAL delivers a seamless transport experience to our customers regardless of location. Help is just phone call away!

PATIENT STORIES

 

There are hundreds of patient stories that we could share. Of these, we selected a handful. We would like to thank these patients for graciously sharing their transport experiences with us. Good stories add meaning to our team and the work we do. We are happy and proud to be a part of them.

 

PATIENT STORY #1
HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS! (Singapore)

 

When Roger Brankton arrived in Singapore take part in a charity basketball event, he had only happy thoughts – do a good deed and enjoy the game! But the affable young man got more than he bargained for. Roger sustained C5/6 spine dislocation during the game. It was one of those freak accidents and he ended up with extreme flexion/extension injury to his cervical spine. The treating physician showed that there was a C5/6 posterior fracture and unstable spinal column.

 

The Situation
Roger underwent a posterior fixation and stabilization and was extubated the next day. Assessment showed complete paralysis of the right upper arm while the left arm was able to perform some horizontal movements. Although he was, undoubtedly, receiving excellent care in Singapore, arrangements were made for Roger to be repatriated to London. Home is, as they say, where the heart is. Especially so when one has met with an unfortunate accident.

 

EMA GLOBAL To The Rescue
In order to get him back to London in the shortest time possible, without having to spend too much time on transit, a wing-to-wing transfer at Athens was arranged. This means that one air ambulance was used to transport him from Singapore to Rome where another air ambulance with its own medical team would be waiting to take him home to London. Using only one air ambulance would mean having to spend time in Rome for the flight crew to take their mandatory rest time.

 

What EMA GLOBAL Did
Prior to departure, EMA GLOBAL’s Medical Director and a senior nurse, together with the medical escort team, made one final assessment to ensure he was fit to take such an arduous journey. Roger, by that time, was able to sit up (albeit with a neck collar) and appears to be comfortable and was able to participate in the discussion. He had a slight fewer at that time (37.5 degree C) and still had some retained secretions in the upper airway but fortunately, that was not enough to jeopardize his tidal respiration. Vital signs then showed a HR 60/min, BP 150/70 with oxygen saturation at 97%. And the good news – he was eating normally.

The medical escort team felt that he should be re-intubated and ventilate him for the repatriation. EMA GLOBAL’s Medical Director strongly recommended against this, highlighting the fact that the patient was a young man of only 22, had showed a lot of motivation to breathe on his own. In addition, his vital signs were normal. Other factors supporting his recommendation against intubation included:

ABG done at room air showed PaO2 86 mmHg with normal pH and CO2. The air ambulance was equipped with nasal BIPAP to support him on flight if necessary. Endo tracheal tube would be most uncomfortable for him, requiring massive sedation. The medical escort then agreed that the patient need not be re-intubated for the flight to London.

 

The Outcome
The repatriation was uneventful. Whilst the abdominal binder was kept on throughout the flight home, the neck collar was released after take-off and re-applied before landing. The patient was sedated with Lexotan throughout the flight. Vital signs were normal and the oxygen saturation was above 96% with intranasal oxygen at 1.2L/min.

 

 

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